Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland

Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland By Jeremiah Curtin, Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland Fearsome giants magic spells Druidic rods of enchantment gallant princes and beautiful princesses brave kings and wicked queens cloaks of invisibility swords of light and swords of darkness horse
  • Title: Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland
  • Author: Jeremiah Curtin
  • ISBN: 9780486224305
  • Page: 209
  • Format: Paperback
  • Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland By Jeremiah Curtin, Fearsome giants, magic spells, Druidic rods of enchantment gallant princes and beautiful princesses, brave kings and wicked queens cloaks of invisibility, swords of light and swords of darkness, horses that go faster than the wind, animals that speak and have strange powersese are elements common to all fairy tales, and they appear prominently in this excellent collFearsome giants, magic spells, Druidic rods of enchantment gallant princes and beautiful princesses, brave kings and wicked queens cloaks of invisibility, swords of light and swords of darkness, horses that go faster than the wind, animals that speak and have strange powersese are elements common to all fairy tales, and they appear prominently in this excellent collection of Irish examples gathered by the renowned folklorist and linguist Jeremiah Curtin 1840 1906 from the West of Ireland in 1887 Taken down from Gaelic story tellers, these 20 tales fall into two parts 11 are miscellaneous stories offering Irish versions of the general European fairy tales, and 9 are stories from the Fenian cycle tales of Fin MacCumhail and his warriors, the Fenians of Erin.The same fairy tale elements apply to all the stories, however, including battles with giants, dead men who come back to life, people imprisoned in the bodies of animals, a wonderful land of perpetual youth, and heroes with incredible strength The heroes in the miscellaneous tales tend to be sons of the Kings of Erin, with heroines like Yellow Lily, daughter of the Giant of Loch L in Trembling, the Irish Cinderella the queen of Tubber Tintye and various princesses who are in danger The Fenian stories relate some of the adventures of Fin MacCumhail, his sons Fialan, Oisin, Pog n, and Ceol n his men Diarmuid Duivne, Con n Maol MacMorna, the famous Cuc lin, and others and strangers who are out to help or hurt the Fenians of Erin in such tales as Fin MacCumhail and the Fenians of Erin in the Castle of Fear Dubh, and Gilla na Grakin and Fin MacCumhail Tales of legend and tales of magic, these stories transport us to a world where everything is alive and anything can happen, a world born in a time before literature, and captured in print just as the oral tradition in Ireland was dying out Considered an essential work in the history of folk lore, this book is also a collection of fairy tales that have fascinated young and old for hundreds of years They will continue to fascinate you and your children.Unabridged republication of the 1890 edition, formerly titled Myths and Folk Lore of Ireland.
    Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland By Jeremiah Curtin,
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      209 Jeremiah Curtin
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    About "Jeremiah Curtin"

    1. Jeremiah Curtin

      Jeremiah Curtin Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland book, this is one of the most wanted Jeremiah Curtin author readers around the world.

    560 thoughts on “Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland”

    1. I can t count how many times I ve picked up this book after finishing it, just to reread a story or two While you may love Hans Christian Anderson or the Brothers Grimm, this is something you have to check out The stories feel similar to our beloved and popular ones, but they have stronger heroines, stronger tests and sillier conquests Yes, it seems strange that to kill a giant, you have to cut down a tree, to set free a fox, with a duck inside the fox and an egg inside the duck that holds the h [...]


    2. Some of the tales were interesting than others Overall, this was a light, easy read I recommend to anyone that likes folk tales and myths.


    3. This collection of Irish folk tales, as told by Jeremiah Curtin, will most likely be at least slightly enjoyable to anyone who is interested in the subject, and the author s own explorative introduction does well to give substance to the collection and demonstrate that Curtin is a writer of merit who is concerned with his own understanding of the material.That said, it is important for the reader to note that these are folk tales as told by Curtin rather than retold by Curtin, meaning he seems t [...]


    4. i ve been reading a tale or two of this every night before going to sleep they make very good bedtime stories these folk tales are a bit different from those from the continent which i m used to there s no obvious to me moral of the story Fin, the big hero, seems to be fairly ineffectual when asked to use his brain or make a decision he s always trying to kill off servants that he likes and respects, because one of his men obviously jealous of EVERYONE wants him to way to go, king of Ireland li [...]


    5. Fairy tales, or rather fairy stories, if that s a distinction meaningful outside of my own head, about sons and daughters and Fionn, who is a son, and the things they do, fighting giants, playing games of chance and always losing the third, stealing clothes from magician s daughters who change into swans, fighting the armies of the king of Spain, outwitting hags, getting a hell of a lot of wise and or magical help to see them through their adventures, marrying up and making out like bandits The [...]


    6. This book was interesting in the beginning and got slow as it progressed The contents of the book had similarities with Cinderella and other everyday story tales Some of the stories were common and copied each other with different characters, so you kind of know what happens next This book of forgotten Irish folk lore was a bit confusing, with it s old time language, but otherwise, it was a great read


    7. There were some really interesting cultural notes in the introduction It s also interesting to note the similarities of some of the stories between popular ones I read before like Cinderella, The Traveling Companion, and King Arthur Having also read some stuff before on Irish literature and culture, it was pretty awesome reading it for myself rather than just references to the stories and themes.


    8. Well, this was interesting I found that I heard of the authors voice than ancient tales being passed down but I suppose that is how it is done, right I am a huge mythology nerd and love reading cultural mythology books but I couldn t find a rhythm with this one Quite a few tales are similar, feel rushed or like they add in random bits that don t flesh out a tale in the end I didn t hate this book but I won t recommend it either among the plethora of Irish Folk Tale books available.


    9. It is so fabulous to study the art of Celtic story by reading through the most popular myths and watching for tropes and common practices to inflect upon my own stories I HIGHLY recommend this resource.


    10. I m going to buy a copy today These folktales have the earmarks of good, fun oral tradition plots veer one way and another but all retain repeating elements, sometimes quests start out with one objective and end up with another, and sometimes things are just fun and weird.


    11. This is an awesome book of Irish tales, including some typical fairy tales, and some stories based off the Fin McCool however that s spelled cycle They didn t seem to be theuh.n stories for McCool, but they were pretty fun to read, if a bit repetitious in parts.


    12. This is an interesting collection of stories, and worth reading, but don t come to Jeremiah Curtin expecting an Irish cadence or tone to the stories He is not a cultural insider, but a visitor to the island.



    13. Great retelling of Irish folk stories, but order of the stories can get confusing because the timeline jumps around so much.





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